The Fifth, students’ file vol.5


61.  Student #5 |

Questions on selected provisions of the COMELEC Resolution No. 7767
By: Student #5
Media 230
Unedited by the Blog Administrator
For purposes of fulfilling the requirements of Media Ethics, UP College of Mass CommunicationCOMELEC Resolution No. 7767 states that:SEC. 11. Prohibited Forms of Election Propaganda. – During the campaign period, it is unlawful:
4. For any newspaper or publication, radio, television or cable television station, or other mass media, or any person making use of the mass media to sell or to give free of charge print space or air time for campaign or election propaganda purposes to any candidate, political party, or party-list group, organization, or coalition thereof in excess of the size, duration or frequency authorized by law or these rules;
5. For any radio, television, cable television station, announcer or broadcaster to allow the scheduling of any program, or permit any sponsor to manifestly favor or oppose any candidate, political party, party-list group, organization, and/or coalition thereof by unduly or repeatedly referring to, or unnecessarily mentioning his name, or including therein said candidate, political party, party-list group, organization, and/or coalition thereof; and xxx
SEC. 20. Right to Reply. – All registered political parties, party-list groups, organizations, and/or coalitions thereof, and bona fide candidates shall have the right to reply to charges published or aired against them. The reply shall be given publicity by the newspaper, television, and/or radio station which first printed or aired the charges with the same prominence or in the same page or in the same time slot as the first statement. xxx
I simply want to raise some points of clarification.
On Sec. 11, par.4, does campaign or election propaganda include exclusive interviews with the political candidates (re: their personal life, past experiences in the public service, personal background, or issues confronting them), in any of the mass media programs? (Anyway, the same is not included in the Prohibited Forms of Election Propaganda). I just think, it can be a form of implicit election propaganda. In this case, to comply with the limit 120 mins. air time, will the entire length of the interview be computed as part of the 120 mins.?
On Sec. 11, par. 5, considering broadcast interviews, how will the COMELEC take the defense of the media, for instance, that they are merely giving the public the right information as to the qualification and eligibility of the candidates by scrutinizing their personal background?
On Sec. 20, who will determine who has the right to reply? Isn’t it a discretion of the media organization?Feb 17, 4:09 PM — [ Edit | Delete | Unapprove | Approve | Spam ] — your assignment. see bulletin board. pls tell others. sorry this is late.

62.  Student #5 | Violation on the Code of Professional and Ethical Conduct of the Philippine Press Institute (PPI)
By: Student #5
Media 230
Unedited by the Blog Administrator

For purposes of fulfilling the requirements of Media Ethics, UP College of Mass CommunicationSince it’s election time, I remember Mr. Rod Izon, DZMM Radyo Patrol Senior Reporter. It’s timely that we have discussed the Code of Ethics of the PPI in our class. I got a chance to have a conversation with Mr. Izon during my internship at DZMM. He was proudly narrating how he is able to manage serving as an elected Senior Board Member in the Province of Bataan, his hometown, while working as a full-time radio reporter. He admitted how his being a radio reporter in one of the leading stations helped him to win the post.I just believe Mr. Izon commits ethical violation on the aspect of Conflict of Interest for it provides among others: (II. Conflicts of Interest, C.3 – “Journalists should avoid political involvement beyond voting. In no circumstances may a staff member seek political office or work, for pay as a volunteer, in a political campaign or organization.”) A committed media person, he actually can’t be a part-time elected public official. I just wonder how he handles reports which may conflict his political involvement.Feb 17, 3:56 PM — [ Edit | Delete | Unapprove | Approve | Spam ] — your assignment. see bulletin board. pls tell others. sorry this is late.

63.  Student #5

Violation on the Code of Professional and Ethical Conduct of the Philippine Press Institute (PPI)
By: Student #5
Media 230
Unedited by the Blog Administrator
For purposes of fulfilling the requirements of Media Ethics, UP College of Mass CommunicationSince it’s election time, I remember Mr. Rod Izon, DZMM Radyo Patrol Senior Reporter. It’s timely that we have discussed the Code of Ethics of the PPI in our class. I got a chance to have a conversation with Mr. Izon during my internship at DZMM. He was proudly narrating how he is able to manage serving as an elected Senior Board Member in the Province of Bataan, his hometown, while working as a full-time radio reporter. He admitted how his being a radio reporter in one of the leading stations helped him to win the post.I just believe Mr. Izon commits ethical violation on the aspect of Conflict of Interest for it provides among others: (II. Conflicts of Interest, C.3 – “Journalists should avoid political involvement beyond voting. In no circumstances may a staff member seek political office or work, for pay as a volunteer, in a political campaign or organization.”) A committed media person, he actually can’t be a part-time elected public official. I just wonder how he handles reports which may conflict his political involvement.Feb 17, 3:49 PM — [ Edit | Delete | Unapprove | Approve | Spam ] — Weisa Orejola writes (08:26:05) : on failure of Ch.5’s Sentro to identify film clips

64.  annelle tayao | Why is this under “News”?
by: Annelle Tayao
(unedited by blog administrator)

*this blog entry contains direct lifts from the articleAn article by Ramon Tulfo entitled “Arroyo’s pride cause of her temper outburst” has committed a number of ethical violations. Although classified under “Metro news”, the writer added personal remarks like “Susmaryosep!”. He also had comments like “They [the public] look at her [President GMA] as arrogant and overbearing” and “…many citizens no longer want her [President GMA] at the top” without giving substantial facts to support these claims. There is also no citation of sources in the article. It has a statement which goes “One wonders how she treated her intelligent students of economics at the Ateneo who asked very difficult questions”, and it was not explained in the article who this “one” is.There were also two other incidents tackled in the article: the incident where Senate President Manny Villar and his wife Rep. Cynthia Villar were denied entry from former President Estrada’s Tanay, Rizal estate, and the alleged foiled kidnap attempt on Philippine Tourism Authority General Manager Robert Dean Barbers. In both stories the writer again made claims that weren’t supported by facts, like “Of course, the order [to prevent Villar and his wife from entering Erap’s estate] came from the palace! Where else?” and “If there really was a kidnap plot, then they were very lucky indeed because their would-be kidnappers were either stupid or plain cowards”.These violations could have been avoided if the article was placed under the “Opinion” category, since it is full of the writer’s opinions; and even so, his claims should still have the proper substantiation.Visit this link to view the whole article.Feb 16, 12:11 PM — [ Edit | Delete | Unapprove | Approve | Spam ] — your assignment. see bulletin board. pls tell others. sorry this is late.

65.  weisa | ABC 5’s late evening news program Sentro committed an ethical violation once again. As previously noted by my classmate Kristine Mangunay, Sentro once failed to attribute its news source properly a few weeks ago. According to the KBP Television Code, film clips of persons involved in the news must be properly identified. However, on February 5, 2007, Sentro did not adhere to that provision again.

A news about the damage caused by the cold weather on crops and vegetation in La Trinidad, Benguet was broadcast by Sentro on the said date. The news program aired a video clip of an interview with an officer from the Department of Agriculture. However, the name of this person and his position was not displayed even once during the whole length of the clip. It may seem like an honest mistake on the part of Sentro but it resulted to an ethical violation nonetheless.Feb 14, 8:26 AM — [ Edit | Delete | Unapprove | Approve | Spam ] — Ethics student Kristine Felisse Mangunay says the Inquirer should use more than one source

66.  Ethics student Kristine Felisse Mangunay says the Inquirer should use more than one source « notes of marichu c. lambino | marichulambino.wordpress.com/2007/02/14/ethics-student-kristine-felisse-mangunay-says-the-inquirer-should-use-more-than-one-source | IP: 72.232.151.9

[…] Published February 14th, 2007 Uncategorized quote “Kristine Felisse Mangunay Feb 11th, 2007 at 10:42 pm quote “PDI stories resort to single-sourcing quote “4th blog entry quote “By: […]Feb 14, 7:04 AM — [ Edit | Delete | Unapprove | Approve | Spam ] — Says Reylee Melendres: “Opinionated” news on Anti-“Terror” Bill in Manila Standard Today

67.  Kristine Felisse Mangunay |

PDI stories resort to single-sourcing
4th blog entry
By: Kristine Felisse Mangunay Student 13 Student 13
Unedited by blog administrator
On February 8, 2007, the Philippine Daily Inquirer ran two stories titled “Beach volley tourney begins today” and “RP Davis Cup squad taking no chances” in the sports section (page A22). Although sufficiently long, the authors of these articles failed to quote more than one source in their stories. In fact, only one specific quote was used from the only source, Tisha Abundo, the game’s organizer, in the first article. The author of the second article quoted the executive vice president of the Philippine Lawn Tennis Association Ajay Pathak. Other than these, both stories were based entirely on research.
This is a violation of the Philippine Press Institute’s Expanded Code of Ethics which states that: “Single-source stories must be avoided as a rule”. In fact, the Code recognizes the need to “get a second, third or more sources, the contending parties to an issue, the expert source, the affected party, the prominent and the obscure in the story” in order to support the assertions in an article.
This violation could have been easily avoided, had the authors conducted interviews with the other people involved, such as the volleyball and tennis players themselves who would be participating in the said tournaments. It must be noted that research, however extensive it is, is still not an excuse to forego interviews with other sources. These are precisely a must, as they enable the reader to obtain different perspectives from various sources on the same issue.
“Beach volley tourney begins today” from the Philippine Daily Inquirer (February 8, 2007): http://pg.photos.yahoo.com/ph/fmangunay/detail?.dir=ef87scd&.dnm=6c06scd.jpg&.src=ph“RP Davis Cup squad taking no chances” from the Philippine Daily Inquirer (February 8, 2007):
http://pg.photos.yahoo.com/ph/fmangunay/detail?.dir=ef87scd&.dnm=6d3ascd.jpg&.src=ph
Feb 11, 10:42 PM — [ Edit | Delete | Unapprove | Approve | Spam ] — Says Reylee Melendres: “Opinionated” news on Anti-“Terror” Bill in Manila Standard Today

68.  Reylee G. Melendres | Journalism’s Off-Limits

Reylee G. Melendres Student # 16
3rd Blog Entry
(Unedited by blog administrator)
It’s a basic rule in journalism not to make a news article opinionated. It is essential to draw the line between the two journalistic writing, news and opinion writing. The Feb. 8-news article (p. A3) from the Manila Standard Today entitled “Finally, Senate Okays Anti-Terror Bill” is a violation of this basic rule. This news article became the basis of the editorial proper (p. A4) of the said newspaper, which lacked sufficient backgrounding.
The word “Finally” shows the stand of the news writer. It reflects the position of the paper regarding that particular issue which should be found in the editorial and not in the news column. The elements of objectivity and fair reporting were distorted by this headline. As being mentioned in the Philippine Journalist’s Code of Ethics, “ Journalists shall not let personal motives or interests to influence their performance of duties.”
The news article discussed mainly those punishments that the senate agreed upon. It didn’t include other important provisions that the public must know such as the criteria for a person or a group of people to be labeled as “terrorist”.
On the one hand, the editorial, which is connected to the aforementioned news, didn’t provide enough contextualization, which made it weak to stand on its own. A reader wouldn’t be able to understand it if he wasn’t able to read the preceding news article. The editorial brought up the issue about Pimentel who voted with the majority to approve the Human Security Act, which is also known as the Anti terrorism Bill without giving a background regarding Pimentel’s issue with the principal author, Enrile.
Another vague information in the editorial is the 12 crimes that the bill covered which were derived from the revised penal code and special laws, which were not elaborated clearly. This violates the first statement of the Philippine Journalist’s Code of Ethics.
The word “Finally” also appeared in the editorial, which obviously proved the bias of the newspaper but it is more accepted to be seen in the editorial than in the news column.
#30
Feb 9, 10:56 AM — [ Edit | Delete | Unapprove | Approve | Spam ] — Notes of Jessica Hermosa on an Inquirer reporter’s article & apparent “pattern”

69.  cleo | yes, i noticed that kris really does demean and embarrass the contestants, maybe she isn’t aware of it, but it reflects badly on her…i like the program, i just wish the host would be more sensitive

Feb 8, 5:19 AM — [ Edit | Delete | Unapprove | Approve | Spam ] — ethics student Weisa Orejola scores Game KNB Host

70.  weisa orejola | weisashes@yahoo.com |

“GAME KNB for Kris Aquino’s demeaning comments?”
by Weisa Orejola STUDENT TEN STUDENT TEN STUDENT TEN STUDENT TEN
Immense popularity does not give anyone the license to humiliate another person in national television. Kris Aquino, for one, should know that. In her daily late morning quiz show Pilipinas Game KNB?, she often condescendingly comments on the contestants’ fashion sense, pronunciation, intellect and other personal matters. By doing so, Aquino is violating the Television Code of Ethics which says that participants in game shows, contests and other audience participation programs shall be treated in such a way that does not ridicule or demean them. Their integrity must not be diminished in whichever way. In one particular episode of Pilipinas Game KNB?, Aquino embarrassed a contestant by disdainfully correcting her pronunciation of the word “tube.” Answering a particular question, the contestant said “choob”. Aquino, with a sneering look, said “it’s not ‘choob’. It’s ‘toob’!” The contestant can only bow down her head in embarrassment. This is a typical scenario in the everyday broadcast of the said game show. In the 60-second jackpot round of the game show, most participants get nasty side comments from Aquino while he/she is answering. “Ano ba yan? That’s very easy,” accompanied by a demeaning facial expression, is a typical reaction from Kris if a contestant fails to answer correctly. Aquino does not only embarrass most of the contestants. She also prods them, without any circumspection, to reveal something about their private lives. A seemingly homosexual contestant is often urged by Aquino to reveal his/her true sexual preference. The contestant then becomes the object of ridicule because of her uncalled for prying.Because of Aquino’s casual tactlessness, courtesy and good taste is often foregone. That’s too bad for the contestants. In the hope of winning a fortune, they go home with a little less dignity instead.Feb 7, 9:10 AM — [ Edit | Delete | Unapprove | Approve | Spam ] — Student Kristine Servando speaks about Y-Speak

71.  weisa orejola | “GAME KNB for Kris Aquino’s demaning comments?”
by Weisa Orejola STUDENT TEN STUDENT TEN STUDENT TEN STUDENT TEN

Immense popularity does not give anyone the license to humiliate another person in national television. Kris Aquino, for one, should know that. In her daily late morning quiz show Pilipinas Game KNB?, she often condescendingly comments on the contestants’ fashion sense, pronunciation, intellect and other personal matters. By doing so, Aquino is violating the Television Code of Ethics which says that participants in game shows, contests and other audience participation programs shall be treated in such a way that does not ridicule or demean them. Their integrity must not be diminished in whichever way. In one particular episode of Pilipinas Game KNB?, Aquino embarrassed a contestant by disdainfully correcting her pronunciation of the word “tube.” Answering a particular question, the contestant said “choob”. Aquino, with a sneering look, said “it’s not ‘choob’. It’s ‘toob’!” The contestant can only bow down her head in embarrassment. This is a typical scenario in the everyday broadcast of the said game show. In the 60-second jackpot round of the game show, most participants get nasty side comments from Aquino while he/she is answering. “Ano ba yan? That’s very easy,” accompanied by a demeaning facial expression, is a typical reaction from Kris if a contestant fails to answer correctly. Aquino does not only embarrass most of the contestants. She also prods them, without any circumspection, to reveal something about their private lives. A seemingly homosexual contestant is often urged by Aquino to reveal his/her true sexual preference. The contestant then becomes the object of ridicule because of her uncalled for prying.Because of Aquino’s casual tactlessness, courtesy and good taste is often foregone. That’s too bad for the contestants. In the hope of winning a fortune, they go home with a little less dignity instead.Feb 7, 9:07 AM —

Single-Sourcing in Manila Bulletin
by STUDENT NUMBER 6
UNEDITED BY BLOG ADMINISTRATOR
5TH BLOG ENTRY
Manila Bulletin published a story last March. 13in the Around the Nation portion of the National News section in the page 8 of the newspaper. The news article was entitled “TF Mapalad hits DAR Chief”.
(see http://www.mb.com.ph/archive_pages.php?url=http://www.mb.com.ph/issues/2007/03/13/MTNN2007031389355.html )
According to the article, Task Force Mapalad (specifically its president Jose Rodito Angeles) was criticizing Reform Secretary Nasser Pangandaman for not addressing the issues of the dispute over their installation of Hacienda Velez – Malaga in La Castellana, Negros Occidental.Angeles said that the protesting farmers in front of DAR are already in their 17th day of hunger strike and Pangandaman isn’t even negotiating with them.The article was clearly single-sourced. We all know that single sourcing is a no-no in news reporting, simply because we need to establish balance and air the sides of all parties involved in the story. In the article, Angeles was the only source. The news writer, Marvyn Benaning, should’ve aired the side of Pangandaman as well.Mar 17, 12:38 PM — [ Edit | Delete | Unapprove | Approve | Spam ] — Conrad S.C. Lacsina illustrates conflict of interest in Philippine Star covering Mayor Sonny Belmonte with six examples of news stories

Reylee G. Melendres
Student 16
5th Blog Entry
(Unedited by Blog administrator)
ConnotationThe Manila Standard Today which was published on March 16, Friday, showed an ethical violation on its news article (p.A2) entitled:“Hawkish” officials criticizedThe title itself is quite problematic because it may connote various meanings which could mislead the public. Hawkish (quote, unquote) can be taken literally or figuratively. It has several meanings and it falls in this definition:
An advocate of all-out war or of measures in international affairs designed to provoke or escalate open hostilities (Webster NewWorld Dictionary, 642).
The article is about MILF separatists who accused some officials of trying to undermine those efforts on peace talks. This news article, which AFP was the source used the religious affiliation Muslim to label those separatists.Here is the actual first sentence:MUSLIM (All Caps) separatists yesterday accused “hawkish” officials of trying to sabotage peace talks.The Philippine Journalist’s Code of Ethics has its provision regarding the recognition of groups and affiliations. It is stated that:Journalists shall not, in any manner, ridicule, cast aspersions on, or degrade any person by reason of sex, creed, religious belief, political conviction, cultural and ethnic origin.By relating Muslim (which is a title for Islamic devotees) to separatists, rebels, and terrorists, this could result into negative connotation. This might also result into hasty generalization, labeling Muslims as rebels or terrorists.In the said article, the use of religious affiliation appeared thrice. The term Muslim is being attached to rebels in the Philippines (14th paragraph) and on the last paragraph wherein the phrase Islamic terrorist groups such as the Abu Sayyaf was being used in the sentence.***Mar 17, 10:50 AM — [ Edit | Delete | Unapprove | Approve | Spam ] — Conrad S.C. Lacsina illustrates conflict of interest in Philippine Star covering Mayor Sonny Belmonte with six examples of news stories

Conrad S.C. Lacsina
4th blog entry
Unedited by blog administrator
The Philippine Press Institute acknowledged The Manila Times Editorial Guidelines as among the sources of its prescribed code of ethics that forbids unfair, inaccurate and single-sourced stories (III 1,2).
Yet, The Manila Times itself violated the above-cited provisions in its news story “Farmer-workers slam TFM lawyer Monsod” that appeared on Tuesday, March 13, 2007.
In it, the writers presented the side only of the Hacienda Malaga-Cuenca Multi-Purpose Cooperative and the Hacienda Malaga Independent Workers Union. The members of the two groups accused Christian Monsod, lawyer for Task Force Mapalad, of, among others, a “coward who would endanger the lives of TFM members for his own interest,” and “dishing out lies to national media.”
A statement was also alleged to be made by Monsod: “install first then we will talk.” However, there was no confirmation from Monsod whether or not he made that statement. The story did not even used “alleged” but relied solely on the account of a source from one side. This was the case in all the other acts the groups alleged to be committed by Monsod such as “put (ting) your people’s lives on the line,” “giving “false hopes,” and “let(ting) your people suffer.”
Monsod’s wife, Solita (Winnie), was also “slammed” by the groups. Espinosa, the spokesperson of the group (the news did not specify which of the two groups), accused Solita of violating media ethics. Her version of the story was also not cited in the news story.
Here is the unfair and single-sourced story from the Manila Times:
“Tuesday, March 13, 2007“Farmer-workers slam TFM lawyer Monsod
By Ma. Ester L. Espina, Correspondent “BACOLOD CITY: Constitutionalist Christian Monsod was challenged by members of the Hacienda Malaga-Cuenca Multi-Purpose Cooperative and the Hacienda Malaga Independent Workers Union to “stop making pawns” of farmer beneficiaries belonging to Task Force Mapalad who failed to have themselves installed in the hacienda at Brgy. Robles, La Castellana town, Negros Occidental. “In a press conference last Friday, management workers slammed Monsod who acts as legal counsel for the militant peasant organization to “see for yourself the situation in Negros before you put your people’s lives on the line,” Romulo Espinosa, spokesperson of the group said. “He added that they have so much respect for Monsod before “but now we have proven he is a coward who would endanger the lives of TFM members for his own interest.” Espinosa added that Monsod should come clean and stop giving “false hopes” to TFM beneficiaries and “reveal your real agenda.” ‘“He should visit the hacienda and witness how the propaganda of TFM has divided families and sow discontent among farmers,” he said, challenging Monsod to bring the fight in Negros Occidental and not hide and use his influence among national media. ‘“Why let your people suffer?” Espinosa queried, referring to the TFM members who are staging more than two weeks of hunger strike before the DAR national office in Quezon City. He dared Monsod to lead the hunger strike “instead of dishing out lies to national media.” “Union president Rodolfo Tupas, Sr. on the other hand said that they have extended an invitation through the Church to sit down with TFM farmer beneficiaries “so we can thresh out these issues, after all, many of us belong to the same families.” “The invitation extended through Fr. Rolex Nueva, Social Action Center of the Kabankalan Diocese which has jurisdiction over La Castellana was allegedly snubbed by Monsod. “Tupas said, Monsod told Nueva, “install first then we will talk.” (unconfirmed quotes)‘“We want to settle family disputes, we want to live in peace. How can he [Monsod] snub this,” Tupas said, adding that this alone makes the former Comelec chairman “suspect of pushing for his own interest.” “They also slammed Monsod’s wife, Solita, whom they have accused of violating media ethics. Espinosa recounted that a month ago, TV personality Solita Monsod sent a team from a national network to interview members of the management team for a CARP special coverage. ‘“We waited, hoping that finally our side will be heard by the Manila people. What we saw however, was biased towards TFM. And she used the network to advance hers and her husband’s interest,” Espinosa said smirking that this was contrary to the network’s tagline “we are for the truth.” “They also countered TFM’s challenge asking for the resignation of Agrarian Secretary Nasser Pangandaman for the latter’s failure to install 122 farmer beneficiaries, 102 of whom are identified with TFM last Thursday. ‘“Changing Pangandaman is not the answer. No matter how many officials you replace in DAR, the problem will still not be solved unless we review the CLOA,” Tupas said. “Management workers also extended an invitation to members of TFM whom they recognize as original tillers of the land to sit down with them and join their fold. “Of the 102 TFM beneficiaries, Espinosa said they recognize 60 percent of them as original tillers of the hacienda, but vowed that they will never allow the entry of others “who never invested sweat or blood in this land.” “They also said, TFM should fight it out with them, farmer beneficiaries, and not against landowner Roberto Cuenca. “This is not his fight, we are fighting for our rights to the land, we are fighting for our children’s future, and we will continue to defend this at all cost.” ’
Mar 16, 10:33 PM — [ Edit | Delete | Unapprove | Approve | Spam ] — Conrad S.C. Lacsina illustrates conflict of interest in Philippine Star covering Mayor Sonny Belmonte with six examples of news stories

No Room for Women in Takeshi’s Castle
Student 9 Kaye Mendoza
3rd Blog Entry 3rd Blog Entry 3rd Blog Entry
unedited by blog administrator
Only this Sunday, March 11, while browsing channels on television, I was able to caught glimpses of the resurrected 90’s reality game show Takeshi’s Castle now shown in GMA 7. Its format is the same as before–Filipino actors are hosting the entire tv show wearing traditional Japanese costumes while clips of the actual game are taken from Japan, thus, most if not all contestants are Japanese. It would have been pure fun if only the hosts, Joey de Leon and Ryan Yllana, were sensitive of their female guests. Last Sunday, they had four celebrity guests—the Roco twins, Rhian Ramos and LJ Reyes. The girls were wearing Japanese-inspired uniforms (above-knee pleated skirt and blouse) while the boys were wearing kimono. They also had other female guests. Perhaps, they were dancers in the station.Distasteful it was. A portion of Takeshi’s Castle featured these women, wearing the same clothes as the two female celebrities, taking turns in jumping on a trampoline. They appeared to be innocently enjoying themselves, “oblivious” to their miniskirts flipping in the air while the male hosts watched them with their eyes wide open. This is unethical because these women were shown doing an act they would not normally enjoy. They were treated as objects to satisfy these men’s sexual fantasy. That portion was pointless, it had no direct relation to the whole show. It obviously served as an entertainment for the male hosts.Mar 16, 10:09 AM — [ Edit | Delete | Unapprove | Approve | Spam ] — Conrad S.C. Lacsina illustrates conflict of interest in Philippine Star covering Mayor Sonny Belmonte with six examples of news stories

“Yucky Kadiri” language in an FM station
by STUDENT NUMBER 6 STUDENT NUMBER 6
UNEDITED BY BLOG ADMINISTRATOR
4TH BLOG ENTRY
I rode a taxi last Tuesday and the radio was tuned in at WRR 101.9. The DJ was someone named Leila, and was doing her talks between songs that afternoon, around 2:30 pm. I think she violated a provision in the KBP’s Code of Ethics during that airing.It was written in the Code of Ethics that “The use of objectionable words or phrases or word which have acquired undesirable or offensive implications, should be avoided…” However, when DJ Leila was on air, she seemed unaware of this provision.She was telling the listeners that summer was approaching, and we’re already feeling the heat. Then she went on discussing the summer-related diseases. She then narrated her experiences suffering from “bulutong” (chicken pox). She said that maybe she was the oldest person to suffer from the disease at age 21. She mentioned “yucky kadiri talaga di ba?” several times, followed by laughter. Not that it’s bad to discuss stuff like that on air, but the thing is, she was too graphic about it. She was talking about her suffering from “bulutong”, then she was describing that she has many “peklat” (scars) after that. And she was describing that “nung natutuyo na ung bulutong niya, natatanggal na ung mga langib” . Furthermore, she said that the cure to the itchiness due to “bulutong” was bathing with oatmeal. Again, she describe it too graphically. And she was talking about all of it with enthusiasm, unaware of those people listening who maybe disgusted with what she’s telling.I think her comments were of bad taste. She was inconsiderate of the listeners, especially those who might be offended with what she’s saying, for example, those who may have chicken pox during that time. She was too fond of saying “yucky kadiri” without thinking of the implications it might brought to people who listen to every word she says.Mar 14, 12:06 PM — [ Edit | Delete | Unapprove | Approve | Spam ] — Opinion of Student 9 on a TV Patrol news story (ABS-CBN)

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